Vandejo project – Replacing the fuel lines


If you are not up to date, this all started when a major fuel leak sprung up after getting Vandejo home. You can read about that HERE.

Day 1 | Day 2 | Day 3 | Day 4

Made some descent progress today, but still don’t have the engine out. There is one transmission bolt keeping me from dropping the engine. The top one on the passenger side. I’ve ran into quite a few “hacks” that have occured to get this engine installed. It’s becoming clear that this was not the original engine. I believe it was not fuel injected from the factory. You’ll notice hints of this later on. One was using some all-thread with a nut on either end to secure the bolt that is giving me issues. I believe this should still be using the D-bolt that is seen on the manual transmission versions, even though this is an automatic. Tomorrow I have to go pick up a 17mm stubby wrench so I can get past this.

The list of alterations to get this engine in have been numerous. First of all, the amount of fuel line used is nearly double that factory amount because the fuel pump was located farther forward than stock. Then, because of the ’74 fuel tank, the line continues in a large horse shoe pattern to head toward the rear of the bus on the passenger side. Another one is the crappy tin-snip job on the driver side to allow for the transmission fluid dip stick and vacuum line to the transmission to come through. I understand having to make this hole, but it didn’t have to look like a bunch of 9mm rounds were used to make it. Also for some reason, the body itself is cut on the rear driver side of the engine bay. Hard for me to describe, so just look at this picture and this picture. (***NOTE*** It was later realized that this may be for the air conditioner hoses that were originally installed) The EGR system on the air plenum has been pinched off (big surprise.) Also, the S-boot has one of the vacuum line entries plugged. Adding to the list, there is no arm extension for the air filter to latch onto. It simply sits there on the passenger side, resting on the intake runners. One of the better alterations is the fact that ’74 heat exchangers have already been put in place. No having to mess with the crappy ’78 exhaust design and NLA pieces.

So on that note, tomorrow should bring more progress. I have about 10′ of new fuel line. The good Mercedes Benz stuff. Also have proper FI hose clamps (not worm drive clamps) a 10mm replacement piece for the section between the fuel pump and filter, and new fuel injector seals and intake manifold sleeves. The pics show plenty of places where my vacuum leak may also be occurring. I am going to see about replacing as many of the vacuum lines as I can since nearly all of the are hosed (no pun intended.)

Full image gallery here