Replacing the fuel line on your fuel injectors, so you don’t have to buy new ones

In new form, the Bosch fuel injectors for the VW bus come with fuel line already attached and at the proper length. But, the past couple years has brought a huge spike in the cost of injectors (cold start valve included.) Three years ago you could get an injector for about $60. Now they are about $150. With the recent work I have been doing to replace the fuel lines on Vandejo, I have replaced the fuel lines on the injectors. The injectors were working fine and I saw no need to replace them.

Insert the following image, which shows how I cut away the old fuel line. Once you cut the old line away, the metal ring holding the line in place will become loose and can be slipped off. You don’t need to cut the metal ring. With that metal ring gone, there is enough room to use a fuel injection hose clamp.

With the old stuff out of the way, you can slip on your new 8mm Mercedes Benz fuel injection line (this is what your using right??) and clamp it down. Below is an image of the finished products.

***Update 2013Jan – Several vendors have the injectors listed from $35 to $70 depending on new or rebuilt.

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Vandejo project – Replacing the fuel lines (cont.)

Day 1 | Day 2 | Day 3 | Day 4

Made a little progress today.  Picked up new gaskets to go between the intake runners and the air intake distributor (see pic.)  Also picked up a new throttle body gasket since the one on there now is hard as a rock.  Will be much easier to replace with the engine out.

I worked on the driver side fuel line and injectors.  The injector seals were in horrible shape and I’m not sure how there could not have been a vacuum leak there. I removed the injectors and carefully cut away the existing fuel line and the metal crimp holding the fuel line to the injector side.  Once you cut the old line away, the metal crimp will simply loosen and fall off.  With that out of the way, there is room to place a fuel injection hose clamp (see pic.)  I put new fuel line and clamps on, and also new seals.  Note that there are two seals per injector.  A larger one that sits under the bracket that holds the injector in place, and another smaller one that goes between the injector and the intake runner.  In my case, the larger ones were ok (I’ll keep them as spares) but the smaller ones were absolutely shot.  You can see how bad it was in this shot.

So tonight, I leave to project with the driver side injectors having new seals, fuel line, and fuel clamps.  Also, the intake manifold sleeves (between the intake runners and the air intake distributor) were put on and the new gasket to go between the intake runners and the head are in place.

New photos from today have been uploaded in the album for this project.  (Filenames starting with 080418….)

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Vandejo project – Replacing the fuel lines (cont.)


Day 1 | Day 2 | Day 3 | Day 4

I left off of day 1 with a single bolt keeping me from getting the engine out of Vandejo. Well, I managed to get the bolt out finally. But getting the engine out afterward was much more labor intensive than I expected. Being an automatic transmission, there is this huge growth of metal between the case and the flywheel that is not on an engine with a manual transmission. You thought it was a tight fit for a manual? Try an automatic.

Needless to say, I will NOT be trying to get this engine back in with out first dropping and mating the tranny to it. Any future engine drops will include the tranny as well. But…..the engine is out now!! It involved my lovely wife Leah, pulling back on the atv jack while I used another floor jack to apply support under the fly wheel and keep it from dragging along the bottom of the transmission bell housing and falling 10 inches to the ground after it cleared. Ah….learning experiences.

***UPDATE – Learning curve applied – This is how you should NOT remove an engine from a bus with an automatic transmission.

You should remove disconnect the torque converter from the drive plate, which prevents all this nonsense :) The following images show you the access hole used to remove and install the bolts.

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